Next Level Human

Harnessing Quantum Biology With Carrie Bennet- Ep. 257

March 07, 2024 Jade Teta Episode 257
Next Level Human
Harnessing Quantum Biology With Carrie Bennet- Ep. 257
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Prepare to unlock the secrets of your inner bio-battery with quantum metabolism guru, Carrie Bennett, who joins me, Dr. JT, for a groundbreaking discussion on the Next Level Human Podcast. We're diving deep into the nexus of quantum biology and human energy regulation, revealing how your body harnesses water and sunlight to power up your life. Say goodbye to the conventional calorie-counting and macro-tracking, as we illustrate through a captivating story of vacation weight loss, the untapped energy sources that surround us and shape our health.

This episode is a journey through the enigmatic world of structured water, the so-called fourth phase of water discovered by Dr. Gerald Pollock. Carrie and I dissect how this negatively charged, gel-like substance is vital for cellular health and how it's influenced by earthing and infrared light. We also unearth Herman Ponzer's metabolic insights that challenge our understanding of energy use across different societies. It's a narrative that will shift your perspective on movement, nature, and our inherent connection to the Earth's energy, transforming the way you think about daily hydration and your body's intricate energy systems.

As we traverse this landscape of human physiology, we delve into the notion that water serves as a fractal antenna within us, channeling frequencies that influence our biochemistry and, perhaps, even our consciousness. From the research of the Heart Math Institute to the power of heart-centered meditations, we discuss how our emotional focus might impact gene expression and our overall state of being. Embark on this enlightening odyssey with us, and discover the profound power of water as the essence of our existence, shaping not only our physical health but our energetic and emotional well-being too.

http://drjade.com/butcherbox

Connect with Next Level Human
Website: www.nextlevelhuman.com
support@nextlevelhuman.com

Connect with Dr. Jade Teta
Website: www.jadeteta.com
Instagram: @jadeteta

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the show, everybody. It's Dr JT to your host of the Next Level Human Podcast, and I have a very exciting guest for me. I am madly in love with this person and I think you guys are gonna be in love with her as well, and from my perspective, she's been someone I've been following for a while. I probably discovered you, carrie, about I don't know six months ago maybe, maybe a little longer, and I've just been eating up all your stuff. So this is Carrie Bennett. Everyone and we were talking about how do I introduce her, and I'm just gonna say she's my quantum metabolism guru. She's sort of my you know, sort of master of quantum biology and she's gonna introduce you all to a really fascinating aspect of metabolism that most of us are ignorant of.

Speaker 1:

Now I know for you, carrie, you've been talking about this an awful lot, so it's it gets old hat and you probably feel like you're on repeat, but I really just want to start out. Actually, I'm gonna go to your Instagram because I think was it okay, so let's just start with this, right? So this is a post you posted on February 12th so they're pretty recently and it basically says you are a battery made out of water charged by sunlight. Now I think, when most people would hear that, they go. What exactly does that mean? And I find this so fascinating. So can you break this down for us in terms of what has been going on in the science that you have been teaching? It sounds like what you're saying is there is a different way that we accumulate energy and create energy in our bodies, besides just the typical what you eat. So I am, so you know, excited about you explaining this to everybody. So thanks for being here.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for having me, jade. I'm really pumped for this conversation too. And yeah, you know that exact like what you just said about our body as a battery made out of water and charged by sunlight is like that was the aha, light bulb moment for me. For me, like, oh, I've only learned part of the equation when it comes to how the human body operates. Right, you know, undergrad, graduate education, all of it was great, but it wasn't until I started studying the body from the perspective of water and how the water in our body behaves that I really started to get into this quantum biology aspect and to realize that we can actually derive so much energy beyond that what we consume in food, and I think this is a very liberating and empowering thing for people to understand, because it means that we're no longer slaves to the macros or to the calories or to, you know, the common things that we go to.

Speaker 2:

And I have found that when my clients max out what they can get what I call it free energy right, when they can max out these free energy sources and we can we can learn out about what that actually means and looks like in the body in a second here. But when we max out on that. They they're. They can regulate their food intake in a way that they've never been able to before. It's almost like, oh my gosh, my body will tell me what I'm hungry for. My body is telling me what nutrient it needs. It's not just about eating food. To eat food for calories or macros yeah.

Speaker 1:

I love this and actually I want to share a brief story with everyone and you as well care, you're gonna get this immediately. And actually one of the things when I started following you, I was like, oh, that's what was going on here, and so one of the things one of the very first clients I had was a woman who was incredibly under stress type a personality. She went from having no kids to basically three kids in under 18 months because she married a man who had kids. Then she had twins. She went through this and I helped her, tried to help her for probably close to two years and she had never taken a vacation. Then, all of a sudden, she took a vacation. She wasn't losing weight, she took a vacation. She came back and she lost more weight than I had ever, you know, seen with her and I was elated and she literally I remember this client always because she started crying right there like so frustrated, like what the hell is going on, like I did everything wrong.

Speaker 1:

I just walked out on the beach, I ate what I wanted to eat, I didn't do my exercise and all of a sudden I lose weight. I'm so confused. Now, I always took that as stress and of course, we know that's playing a role. She de-stressed. But now, looking at it through this lens, I'm like, here she is walking on the beach every morning getting bright light. You know drinking, you know water that's more pure, you know she was down in Costa Rica and different, you know, like.

Speaker 1:

And all of a sudden I'm like, oh, maybe what happened to her was, yeah, partly stressed, but a lot of what Carrie is educating on, and so it really did change my perspective, because I've been thinking about this just through the biochemical lens, not necessarily the quantum lens, and of course, this is biochemistry as well, but there's something underneath, and so I wanted to share that, because I think that when we look at it through this lens, all of a sudden you're right. Some people begin to, you know, regulate cravings, not be as hungry, lose weight without trying and we do, if we pay attention, have evidence for this whenever we have people who, like I, went on vacation and lost weight, like maybe that's what's going on. So what do you, what do you feel about that? Are you seeing that kind of thing as well? And you're kind of like, yeah, I think this is part of the mechanism totally, it's part, it's both.

Speaker 2:

It's both the stress and then the free energy we're getting from the environment, because we know stress alone can tank mitochondria function by at least 15%, and in my opinion, mitochondria are the hub of where it's at. When we talk to them about a tabloid them because they make ATP, which is what I think a lot of people are aware of, but they also make metabolic water, intracellular water, and that actually is where what I'm talking about when I talk about the energy aspect of the cell. It really is dependent on the bodies, the mitochondria's ability to make this water, and she was literally doing all the things that she needed to do to maximize my mitochondria water production from the circadian rhythm, signaling of getting out in natural light, from, you know, earthing and grounding and things that are going to regulate both her nervous system, but also then is another way that she could pull free energy from from her environment. She was away, probably from a lot of tech and you know the things that can can deplete the mitochondria and create some mitochondrial dysfunction, and so she was literally just putting her body back into the state where her body was just like oh, I know how to make energy.

Speaker 2:

It's not stress, I can do this. And then that's when that's when things like leptin come into play, which I don't know if we're even gonna get to today, but that's when the body can say, oh, we don't need all this extra fat for my body frame. My body frame doesn't need this much fat because I'm in an environment where energy is plentiful not just calories are plentiful, but energy is plentiful and that's when the body can start to burn body fat, just second nature, because it doesn't feel like it needs to hoard it anymore yeah, and, and actually we can touch on that.

Speaker 1:

Just, I think a lot of my, a lot of my listeners are practitioners, so they're gonna love you. They're, they're pretty savvy with this. So, just as a reminder, everybody you know, leptin is sort of that fat stat. It is the, the hormonal signaling molecule that is released from the fat to tell the hypothalamus hey look, you've got enough energy on your body and you can become leptin resistant in many ways. And I think this is what Kerry is telling us is that when we can plug into different energy sources, our leptin stat starts to work better. So correct me if if I'm getting that wrong, kerry, but let's, let's talk here just for a minute about. So I love this idea of plugging into free energy, right, so I do want to get into exactly what this, this water, is.

Speaker 1:

But maybe I want to start with this idea of like when I as a biochemist that's my undergrad degree and I'm a naturopathic doctor and mainly I've spent most of my time biochemistry, hormonal physiology, especially surprisingly, as many people know female endocrinology but one of the things that you learn as a biochemist, when you really get down to the basics, you can focus on all these different enzymes. You can focus on the Krebs cycle and you could focus on all these different compounds, but in the end, what it really is isn't is an electron management system in a sense right. So, like, when I look at you know biochemistry at its core. You know I'm thinking electrons, and of course, people like you reminded me to be like yeah, jade, keep thinking like that, because as soon as you get lost and move away from the electrons, you're getting lost in the weeds.

Speaker 1:

So I want to talk about this a little bit. So we get electrons from food, but we get electrons from other places, correct? And so is this what we're talking about? When you say plugging into these free energy sources, is this what we mean? That we're basically accumulating electrons in other ways and moving electrons around in other ways besides just breaking down food?

Speaker 2:

Totally, that's exactly what it is right. And so if we look at I love to take just a typical cell right it's very common to understand that a healthy cell needs a negative charge. Sometimes and I think this is where you know us as clinicians we can kind of get confused as well, because that is also can be translated into a pH too right, and so slightly alkaline, right In terms of the pH. But that actually means that that's a cell that needs a negative charge, it needs adequate electrons, and the way that it gets that negative charge is through the water. The water inside that cell is very special and a lot of research has shown that when this water is lacking inside of a cell, that is when a cell can become cancerous, that's when a cell can create a Warburg metabolism which goes beyond just cancer. It goes that's autoimmune cells, that cells that are just highly inflammatory, and so there's something synonymous with maintaining adequate charge inside of the cell, negative charge inside of the cell for a healthy cell to function and, as I said before that cell, that charge is the water. This is where it was key for me, because I had never heard about the idea that the water in our cells or in our bodies was any different than water in a glass. Right, my assumption? You get it right. Every single biochemistry or biology textbook we open, we see a cell sliced in half and there's blue. We know it's the cytosol. And the assumption is is that it's just this liquid that things can dissolve in and flow through, essentially? And it turns out that that water inside of the cell is nothing like that at all. It actually takes on a very unique structure. It's more of a gel-like consistency, and so this is the work of Dr Gerald Pollock, for those who are interested. It's the fourth phase of water, where now we know that the water actually inside of us, when it comes into contact with hydrophilic surfaces, which are everywhere inside of the cell, it creates what's called an exclusion zone, Meaning the H2O molecules. Instead of kind of sloshing around willy-nilly interacting with other water molecules like it would in its true liquid state, the H2O molecules rearrange their configuration so that they form a hexagonal lattice structure next to all biological surfaces. And when you actually do like what I call it, I call it, you know chemistry, math, and it's like let me count, there's Hesitorzones, let me count the number of electrons. Here the number of protons Turns out, instead of being neutral, like we all assume water would be, because that's how water is in its liquid state, water in this gelled exclusion zone state is negatively charged.

Speaker 2:

So it's the fact that a cell that has adequate amounts of exclusion zone water is a cell that has adequate negative charge. And not only that it's called exclusion zone water because it literally excludes anything from penetrating through it, meaning that every biochemical reaction that we're talking about is happening through these water layers. These molecules aren't ever physically touching if not through these water layers, and it turns out that these water layers help the molecules and the proteins take on the correct configuration so that they can even interact in the first place. So this is everything right. This gelled water is everything when it comes to a healthy cell, and so then, that beg the question for me as a clinician how do we maintain this charge? How can we actually have cells with this charge?

Speaker 2:

And, like you said, it goes beyond the food. This is where I can touch the earth and have the negative charge of the electrons from the earth go through my bare skin and help to funnel where this charge is depleted. I can even move. There's evidence to suggest that the piezoelectricity through my connective tissue and movement through my connective tissue, so the electricity generated through my connective tissue can also funnel through this system and create charge where it's lacking.

Speaker 2:

I believe that when people are sedentary, it isn't about the number of calories that they're burning or not burning, it's that they're not maintaining this charge that they can build through movement alone.

Speaker 2:

And then the real game changer, which you alluded to in that post that you referenced, was the fact that we now know that infrared light if this charge is actually depleted inside the cell, this beautiful metabolic water gets depleted, that when the cell or when that water is exposed to infrared light, it expands. It's like charging a cell phone battery Saying we're designed to essentially have our feet touching the earth, skin in the light, soaking up that beautiful infrared from the sun, and that's what maintains healthy cells. And modern living has just divorced us from that so drastically that that's where we're starting to see cellular dysfunction, metabolic dysfunction. It's because we are no longer driving energy from all of these other sources, which means we only can rely on the electrons from food, and that, as you know, then it literally is I think, I only think it can is about a third like, not less than, the energy we can get from our environment.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's really interesting, right? Because then we can start seeing food, as you know, maybe foods where we get mainly our nutrients from and rather than our energy from exclusively. And let me just repeat this, Carrie, and you just correct me along the way. I like to do this just because whenever we get a brand new concept, I just want to repeat it for everyone so they can understand this. Then you just correct me wherever I get it wrong.

Speaker 1:

So, if I'm hearing you correctly, we have this water in our cells. It's not just the cytosol, but we have this special water. There's actually a book, by the way for everyone, called the Fourth Phase of Water, by this researcher, Gerald Pollack. If you want to read that, it's very technical reading, but it's very interesting reading for you practitioners, but anyway, so we have this water in this cell and we have all these hydrophilic substances, because this cell is filled with protein, nucleic acids, you know, mitochondria, all these things, and this water seems to behave differently whenever it bumps into these hydrophilic substances, forming a layer that is more negative and a layer that is more positive, right? So we have this negative charge aspect of the water, this hexagonal, you know, exclusion zone water, which pushes out all the solutes and you have these protons, sort of you know, pushed out a little bit, so this charge is created, and what you're saying is that this is what is organizing the intracellular mechanics and communication and that without this water, perhaps we can't actually have these energy production factories doing what they're doing. The other thing you alluded to as well is that the mitochondria are instrumental in creating this water, so they probably use this water to do their job, but they're also instrumental in creating some of this water. So that was the first part that I think I understood from you, and the next part, then, is somehow, when we are walking around outside, because the earth is negatively charged as well we can grab electrons from this that propagate through this water.

Speaker 1:

Because I guess the part that I'm missing and correct me on this is that if we look at this water, this water really is all over us. We're basically bags of water, so it goes from the top of our skin all the way down to, you know, the middle of our bone, from the top of our head down to the bottom of our feet. All this water is basically everywhere, and so we are essentially taking, you know, electricity electrons from the earth and putting them into our body. We are taking electricity from the food we eat. We are charging this up with the light that our skin exposed to. It's a really interesting thing. So this light hits our body and actually increases the amount of this hexagonal fourth phase of water, which charges us up more. It sounds like you're saying, and this is how we begin to understand this new form of energy. So what did I miss? Or do we need to make sure people get right here? What aspects are we missing or we need to add on to?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know, you got all of that right. I would say the. It is important to recognize that, like you said, our body is mostly water by molecular count. If I were to lay out all the molecules, I would have of different, like you said nucleic acids and proteins 99 out of every 100 would be water, because it's such a small molecule, meaning water is everywhere and the majority of the water in our body takes on this exclusion zone, water structure. And that because it's this. It's almost like I call it a connective to, or I call it a continuum, a super highway of water, right? So our entire body is really interconnected via this exclusions on water network.

Speaker 2:

And so that is how, let's say, the beautiful images that people could pull up if they wanted to on their computer would be things like before and after what red blood cells look like before earthing and after earthing. And so oftentimes we see red blood cells that are stacked on top of each other like pancakes, in a very disorganized or more prone to clumping and clotting, if you will. That's called a Ruloform. And so that's not healthy blood flow, right? That's not a healthy system to deliver oxygen and nutrients to the cell. We want those red blood cells to be their own individual little rafts that are carrying all of the nutrients and oxygen that they can independently. And so in order for red blood cells to not create this stack, this stacked format, they actually have to have a halo of negative charge of exclusions on water around them. It's called their Zeta potential, and so we now know that you could see someone's live blood analysis before earthing and have a lot of Rulof. And then, after five or 10 minutes of earthing, all of a sudden these red blood cells plump away from each other and they no longer stack together. Because try to touch two negatively charged ends of a magnet, of two different magnets together, right, you never can. Right, they'll always repel. And so that's how, just touching the earth. I have this network where I can just touch the earth with any part of my bare skin and it replete charge, it replenishes charge where the body needs it. That's the intelligence of the human body. It knows where it's needed, and so that's how this happens. You can also see it in before and after images with earthing and inflammation right Like hot spots on thermographic scans of these inflamed, like, let's say, arthritic joints. And then all of a sudden, after earthing, you see that the inflammation is calmed because we can flow this charge in, and now this charge also can act as an antioxidant as well.

Speaker 2:

So viewing the body through this lens has created almost like a unifying factor. It's a unifying effect as opposed to okay, let me look at the body in terms of what's happening with just the metabolism and calories versus movement and exercise. And it's like, wait a second, what if this is what gets benefited from all of the different things that we consider health promoting? It's really helping the body to establish and maintain this beautiful negative charge. And then you did say that the exclusion zone. It is negatively charged. And, yeah, it becomes negatively charged because it's got to kick out a positive charge right in order to do that. Otherwise it would stay neutral and that positive charge does line up directly next to it, and that is what we call charge separation.

Speaker 2:

That's a battery. It's why batteries have a positive end and a negative end, because all of a sudden, when you plug them into a system, into a circuit, if you will, electricity flows. That's work and that's what I want people to view. What's happening with biochemistry in their cells. It's like I'm plugging my body into this system of reactions. That really is just dependent on, like you said, exchanges of electrons and protons. If we have an adequate amount of this, exclusions on water that flows very naturally and efficiently. When we don't, that's where we can start to talk about issues. But this is really for me, just as a clinician and just a science brain, it's just like, wow, this is such a cool way to view human health.

Speaker 1:

It's Carrie, it's so profound and you do such an amazing job teaching this, and let's explore this a little bit more in terms of ramifications. So you know, one of the things that I tend to think about right is like if we think of biochemistry, right, and then we think what's on top of that right, so biochemistry leads to you know, hormonal physiology, and then we can, you know, kind of be like, and then tissues do their thing and then organs do their thing, and we've kind of stayed there. But what you're essentially saying is there's a energy scaffolding that underlies all of that, that is guiding all of that, and this has ramifications in the way that we think about even physiology, something as simple, as you know. Let's take something that might blow some people away in terms of we tend to think, like the heartbeat right, that that beating of the heart is a strong enough pump to just push everything around the body. But when you look at that, it's really not a strong enough pump. You kind of need another force at play. And this exclusion zone water in the bloodstream may be actually the pump, because one of the things I was fascinated when I was reading Pollock's work is that when this exclusion zone forms inside. If they put like little tubules inside this water, you get a continuous flow that simply will not stop. Now the only way that happens is this charge separation that Kerry is talking about.

Speaker 1:

So now imagine we have this network effect everyone. That's actually Perhaps much faster and more efficient than some of the things we think about. Like, for an example, let's say we're getting ready to get in a car accident and you know we are whole body floods with adrenaline. That is a pretty slow process to feel like we feel that effect and we think that's an adrenaline effect, that energy effect, that immediate effect we feel. But that's a pretty slow thing for the adrenal glands to release adrenaline, for to pass through the bloodstream, for to go to all these places, but we feel this energy immediately, perhaps, just perhaps. This is again this exclusion zone network that is Transducing this stuff, you know, essentially, as you know, faster than what we could ever imagine, and this is the reason why we can react so quickly. So there are ramifications here that that this starts to explain a little bit. So I don't know if you have anything to say about that, but I think it's very interesting then when we start to look at some of these long-held things that we just Assume. This is the way it works. Now, when you add this other layer in, you go oh no wonder it's so fast, oh no wonder it's so efficient, oh no wonder I feel so energized by sunshine.

Speaker 1:

Two things we didn't talk about what you mentioned one, but one. I want to mention another one. Carrie mentioned movement, and I want to come back to this piezoelectric effect of the fascia, and I also want to talk about breath, breath work, right, because if we're talking about plugging into all these different energy systems and creating this charge in this water, well, carrie talked to us about, you know, sunlight and light in general, infrared light in particular, talked about grounding. We talked about movement, which comes from this piezoelectric effect in the fascia. So we definitely want to cover that a little bit more. And then there's also breath work, and maybe you're aware of others that I'm not aware of, but let's talk a little bit just more about that, wherever you want to go With that in terms of these different places to go, maybe starting with this piezoelectric movement effect.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, we kind of it really quickly. Your adrenaline comment really piqued my interest because I've always wondered the same thing too in terms of, okay, I understand we could test for hormones and we could measure up hormone amounts in blood and saliva, but, like you said, so many hormonal reactions happened so fast. And so what is there an underlying reason that in this water network and I believe there is, what have that? This exclusions on water? Because it's a gelled shape, it helps different receptors and molecules hold a certain form right, and everything is dependent on shape. All proteins have to have the exact perfect configuration For to be, to be operational. Same thing with a receptor, same thing with, you know, a substance that's gonna supposed, that's supposed to bind to these receptors. But it never made sense for me that there had to always be a physical docking for things to take place.

Speaker 2:

Now I think what we're understanding is that we actually, in response to an environmental stimulus, even sound, we now know that the water around a protein or around a, around a receptor, can actually Help this protein or receptor chains. It change its shape to either become active or inactive. So it's not. It, like you know, the adrenal glands may release adrenaline, but it doesn't have to necessarily diffuse throughout the system, it's just that has a certain resonance, a certain vibration. These receptors all of a sudden become activated because of an environmental stimuli. The water Literally changes its shape and now we get the, the reaction that we feel with adrenaline. It doesn't have necessarily to do with the docking and the binding, because it's too fast to happen. So it's such a cool again way to view how the water in our body is changing in response to our environmental stimuli.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, let me say something about that because I think that is so fascinating. So One of the things that I think that I have changed my mind on is the exact same thing. And you know, if you take two tuning forks, right, you, you take, you know, let's say it's a 400 Hertz tuning fork and you hit it and you have another, you know 400 Hertz tuning fork, this thing is gonna start going off whether you hit it or not. And I think what you're speaking of here, carry, is this idea that it's the frequency. So let's imagine, let's just play a game.

Speaker 1:

I don't know if this is exactly how it works, but let's imagine the adrenal glands release adrenaline. Adrenaline goes into this water. This water picks up this frequency of adrenaline and like a wave you know, we all know, that water passes waves. Now imagine a super, you know quantum fast wave that goes through the body, that's resonating, particular music that causes this. You know other enzyme to Change its shape, because it's it's picking up that frequency like a tuning fork, and that perhaps that is the mechanism and or another mechanism, perhaps both are going on, I don't know. But I just love that idea because, like you, it tends to make more sense in terms of the speed at which we process, you know, information and our body has to respond, doesn't make sense that things have to Slowly be released, slowly go around the bloodstream, then find each other, then, doc, I mean, all of that's going to take time. So we're talking about something.

Speaker 2:

From my perspective, it makes a little more sense saying, yeah, that's exactly how I view it and who knows what you said, that I'm certain there may be some instances where docking takes place, but it just can't. It's just not fast, right. It's just not fast enough to explain the complexity of the human organism and how we respond to our environment and, by the way, just People are interested.

Speaker 1:

I know carries aware of this, which is in case people want to know. This has actually been proven in human scent. We now know that scent is not just a docking mechanism, it is a frequency mechanism and we know this because we can have the same molecule with heavier, like you can have deuterium in. You know that makes the molecule heavier and it will Not smell exactly the same that that. That has been proven in actual humans. So we know there's these quantum effects going on, but let's talk about this. What I think is we're going to be really interesting. This piezoelectric effect. People probably have never heard that word. It has everything to do with the water. You know, notice how Kerry set us up with the water first, because this is. We have to understand that. But let's talk about then movement and what this thing even is and how is this related?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, sure, so I mean our connect, so our fascia. It here's the deal, right. This kind of bothers me, and maybe you've been annoyed by this too. But when we look at what things are named anatomically, it's the fashion. In particular, the connected tissue is given different names depending on where it's located, but it's all one continuous fabric. And so you've got the fashion that maybe people can feel, or perhaps maybe you've had to roll out your IT band or you know, you've got some tight fashion on your low back or or like little knots of connected tissue between your shoulder blades. I mean, yes, that is true fashion, absolutely. But if we get some at a smaller scale, that fascia becomes the, a fascia surrounding this, surrounding the outside of a cell called the extracellular matrix. There's proteins that'll allow it to actually penetrate into the cell, where it becomes what's called the cytoskeleton, and it can actually actually even penetrates into the nucleus of every cell, where it's called the nuclear matrix. And I want people to view this as just like one fine webbing. And this webbing is Hydrated with connect, with exclusions on water all around it, and the connected tissue is really beautiful because it's the way that the molecules are kind of twisted and organized it, they take on what's called a liquid crystalline status.

Speaker 2:

It's it's a very much an ordered fashion, and crystals are piezoelectric, meaning when they become the life you were to strike a quartz crystal, it's going to generate sparks. It's how a watch keeps time a Quartz watch right. And so we have the same thing in our bodies. We've got this beautiful liquid crystalline connective tissue at all scales, surrounded by liquid crystalline water, because that's what this exclusions on water is meaning. We have a connected tissue super highway that, anytime it's it's, you know, moved or twisted, or sheared or or pressed upon, compressed it's generating electricity. And so this is one of the ways that I do think we maintain Charge status. Negative charge status is because our body was designed, through movement, to do just that.

Speaker 1:

I love that so much. So, yeah, and what's interesting too is like when I was in doing anatomy, you saw this, right, it's like you. You saw the fascia covering the muscle, but then you would see the fascia covering the organs, and there was always just fascia to get through. What you're saying is there's fascia that we couldn't even see, that it's all a web, from our skin down to the core of our bones, from the top of our head Down to the bottom of our feet, and then this is basically Water is moving through this and all around this, and it's this exclusion zone, battery water, and so, in a sense and again, just like spider web, if you touch one part of the web, the whole web is sort of affected. This is what you're saying, and this piezoelectric effect is, if I start to move, I can generate Energy from that. I can actually generate some of this.

Speaker 1:

Now, here's one of the things that I think is really interesting about this.

Speaker 1:

So, as we began to move or don't move, like if we're sitting constantly and you alluded to this very early on if we're sitting Constantly, you know, is the thought that this, you know, we're not getting any of this piece piezoelectric effect at all, and so the body is built to move. And then I'm wondering and this is Speculative, but maybe you actually know the mechanism here that when you don't move, do some of these. You know this super this, you know fascial highway, this fascial energetic highway Does it become blocked in some way so that now, all of a sudden this is why we are feeling particular areas that you know, our Stagnant or you know it almost reminds me of like, you know, you got flowing streams and then you got like little puddles off to the side and these puddles are incredibly Stagnant. There's all kinds of stuff growing in them, but then you look at the stream and it's crystal clear water. So is this partly what your thinking is going on with movement and why certain people, you know, run into issues?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely, you know, because what we now know is that anytime a connective tissue is lacking Exclusions on water, it becomes tighter, right, it feels like a knot, and then if you measure the hydration content of it, it's a lot less and it's also less conductive. And so you absolutely are. By sitting, we create what are called fascial adhesions, meaning we're not, we're really not designed to sit like this. So what? What do we have the tendency to do? Well, in sitting like this, I would have the tendency to move my head forward right, and my my body's like what the heck? That's not the right position.

Speaker 2:

So it's always trying to pull my head back into appropriate alignment and if I'm not activating my muscles appropriately to do that, it only can lay down fascia and it lays down this really kind of Disorganized, really adhered to, dense fascia which people are like oh, I'm so tight all the time, right, I need a massage.

Speaker 2:

And it's because their body is trying to lay this fascia down to support that they're posturing, or their poor posture, if you will.

Speaker 2:

That fascia is not gonna be fully hydrated, so it's not gonna be flowing this piezoelectric effect as efficiently. Same thing, maybe, with the hip flexors to write the tightness of the hip flexors, and so you can see these little fascial blocks or these blocks of piezoelectric flow. That can happen in the body, and not always, but sometimes I can correlate it to an organ system Because, as you know, in traditional Chinese medicine we have meridians that also are designed to flow this energy and different meridians are going to like, for example, if I see a lot of neck shoulder tension because of a forward head posture, I ask about the gallbladder, and or I ask about the kidney and the bladder. There's, there's things that I look for and I could oftentimes make a connection between how someone is sitting, how their fascia is dehydrated in the back of their neck, and then what we can maybe do to support them. That doesn't involve tending to even their gallbladder in the first place.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's fascinating and I want to get into some of the stuff that people might see a little bit as woo woo a little bit later. But one of the things I don't know if you're aware of Herman Ponzer's work, but this might be interested, interesting for a lot of people. He's. He's what I would consider the, the world premier expert at a Duke University in metabolism and one of the things he went. He went and looked at hunter gatherer societies, the hudsa and others. He and he looked at what was the difference in the energy that they were using and a lot of people thought, well, they're walking a lot more. And he was like, well, actually not as much as we think, they're complete a little bit more, like 12,000 steps per day.

Speaker 1:

The average American is somewhere around 5 to 7,000, but fit people could easily get that. So that wasn't it and he looked at all these different things. But one of the things he found is that the way they rest. They don't have chairs, so they're resting in active resting positions and little micro movements in their muscles and you know, so they're kind of squatting down on the floor or they're sitting up and their body is not like us where we sit in a chair and we can be completely, you know, without movement. They're moving a ton, and so this piezoelectric effect just makes me think it's like it's going on in them with all these different things. And what he showed is that that, from a calorie perspective for those that care about that is that these resting positions, these active rests rather than resting rest, were a huge component of how much actual energy they burn calorically.

Speaker 1:

Now, of course, we're not speaking of that, we're going a little bit deeper, but it does make me think of what you're talking about here, that there, even if we have different active resting positions versus, you know, just like you and I sitting right now, that could perhaps make a difference here, and so this is another way that we and it sounds like, and this is the way I this is one of the things I wanted to ask you, because I'm unclear on this, but so one of the things I've been struggling with is this idea of which of these things are plugging in and gathering electrons and which are which are moving electrons. So this piezoelectric effect right, it sounds like you're actually creating electrons, you know from this, and the water is then moving them around. So is it both in this case. So that's one of the things where I'm like so when we're moving, we actually are creating electrons, and then this water is moving them around, correct or not?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely. We've got different places in the body where we can essentially store reservoirs of charge. So, like I said, in the cytoplasmic water itself, in the cell membrane right. That acts as a capacitor, so again, a little like mini storage port for where we can have this, where we can store extra charge or the charge that can then be distributed if needed, and so the body has the ability to pull it in, flow it if it's needed and then store it in membrane potential or around the red blood cells and things like that. And they're constantly just shifting and changing because we're very much metabolic, metabolically active species and so it's never really just going to stay static. It's all it really is always flowing.

Speaker 2:

The things that are really what I consider to be important for people to understand is what's depleting charge right, what is really pulling it from my body, and that I look at, what is actually shrinking the exclusions on water and or what's impairing the mitochondria's ability to make that water at step four right of the electron transport chain, and that would be, in my opinion, blue light, artificial blue light and non-native EMFs.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. There's also mitochondrial toxins like glyphosate, heavy metals that come into play as well. But things that people don't think of is how our lighting environment and how our tech use is actually really impairing this process. It's stealing charge from our bodies and so by addressing that area with clients, it can go a long way towards when they do have an opportunity to go outside and earth, it doesn't have to be for hours on end. They can do these little two minute recharges and their body is actually holding this charge now and holding on and able to perform work because of it, because they're not just losing it all the time to their environment, to our modern indoor environment.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love that you bring that up, Carrie. And just in case you guys don't know what non-native EMF is it's all of our electronics, our Wi-Fi, all of these kinds of things, right, and we're bathed in this constantly and, look, we're aware that this is pretty controversial, but it also makes an awful lot of sense that this stuff is going to have an impact on us. So from my perspective, it's like more than ever. It doesn't mean it's going to kill us and blow us up or anything. It just means we better be aware more than ever of trying to make sure we get this electron charge in other places and also beginning to take care of some of these things unplugging things around our bed, Wi-Fi Some of this stuff can be pretty amazing. Let's talk any other things you want to say on that, because I want to ask you about breathwork as well.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I love breathwork. Yeah, I love breathwork. That's fine. Yeah, let's go with it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So from my perspective then, how do we? Because people will go through breathwork. They'll do breathwork, obviously, when exercise is breathwork, it's both. So to me it's like people are like what are breathwork? I'm like, well, just going out and running is partly breathwork and you're moving as well. But breathwork is becoming more and more popular now with Wim Hof who, I think, popularized tumor breathing for the world, and there's different effects. But how does this work? Because many people might be like, well, I feel completely energized and research is showing that just through breathwork alone we can change our mood, we can lift our energy, we can improve VO2 max and all these other things that some of us biochemists care about. But what is going on here from your perspective in terms of? Does this crossover into also charging up this exclusion zone, water?

Speaker 2:

Well, the reason we breathe is because that oxygen ultimately becomes water in our mitochondria. So that is exactly what's happening If we are efficient breathers, meaning we have an ability to not only breathe and pull air into the lower lobes of our lungs, where there's more blood perfusion, more blood flow, but then obviously that needs to get transported through where it's needed to the mitochondria, but we also have to then build up adequate carbon dioxide to release that oxygen to the cells in the first place. So I've seen a lot of people make massive improvements simply by being aware of the fact that they were mouth breathers and they had poor carbon dioxide tolerance. Those two things alone made a huge difference, because all of a sudden now the oxygen can go to the mitochondria and the mitochondria can turn it into water. If mitochondria can't turn the electron flow and the hydrogen flow or the proton flow into water, then it really creates a dysfunctional situation inside the cell, inside the mitochondria, and so again, we breathe because we use that oxygen to become the oxygen of H2O.

Speaker 2:

I mean things that we never think of, right, like at all. It's also why, when we look at even things like this, a little outside of breath, work but we look at like wait, but what about fat burning? What about using fat as a fuel source versus carbs? Fat becomes more metabolic water, right, it's just that. It's not necessarily about you know, fat's good, fat's bad. It's that fat becomes more metabolic water, and so it all, for me, comes back to this water pathway here.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you guys probably see now why I just have such a fan of Kerry, because you do, you know, it really is interesting, like probably for you and your mind. You're just kind of like this is so simple, but it does take someone like your brain to kind of go hey, wait a minute, let's take a step back, and you make this very simple for all of us. That's like the simplest explanation and it helps us reframe even the macro nutrients, which is just beautiful to kind of think about. It's really about this metabolic water which is everywhere in our body.

Speaker 1:

Now, one of the things I want to throw out, because I know people ask this, or maybe they've never asked it this way, so then they might say, well, why do we need to eat, right, and by the way, and we're talking about water, so the mitochondria is making it, but then why do we need to drink water and can we drink this structured water? So there's this thing of like, well, if we make all this energy from all these other places, why do we need food at all? And what does this mean for hydration in general? Because we're talking about water and most people would think we get water from water. So what do you have to say on those two things?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, sure, we eat because we need nutrients, right, we need building blocks, we need substrate for all the physical tissue that we have in our body. So we absolutely need nutrients from our food, and so that's, there's a reason to eat, for sure. The thing, the second one in terms of what do you ask for? The second one there, jade, I had some.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm trying to remember what I asked to know. So the first one is why do we need to eat? And the second one is water you know, so when are we drinking water? Can we drink this structured water? I hear this all the time and Slake's like well, can I just drink this structured water?

Speaker 2:

We have lots of people marketing about structured water, right, so no, that's, that's perfect, and so hang on my mic just, or my headphones just broke for a second here.

Speaker 1:

And it does kind of change. It's really interesting too, just as an aside, as you fix that. It's really interesting too because I oftentimes think whenever I go down to Costa Rica, I feel great in general and I'm eating tons of fruit which are loaded with water, and we have to remember that a lot of our food is a water source. We don't think of that either, so part of me just thinks you might be getting structured water through food. But I'm going to let you answer.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, no, it's true, it's true. So, yeah, I mean, there's a lot of layers there, right, there's a lot of nuance, there's no one size fits all. But what I'm gonna tell you is that the water we drink primarily goes to our blood volume. We wanna maintain an appropriate amount of water in our blood, and when it's not there, when we get too little in our blood, that's a sign of dehydration. Dehydration, then, from there means that let me take a step back.

Speaker 2:

We drink water, it goes to our blood volume. Once it's in the blood, then it leaves the blood and it bays the space in between the cells it's called the interstitial fluid and then from there some of it does go intracellularly, but the vast majority of the water that's needed inside of our cells comes from what the mitochondria can make. So this is very important water for, like I said, blood volume, and that interstitial space is important. That interstitial fluid is where nutrients pass through and waste exchange takes place. So healthy lymphatic flow, lymphatic drainage, is dependent on the water we drink as well. The other thing about the water that we drink is if we're in a very dehydrating environment which modern living does create a very dehydrating environment and the blood volume drops too low. Here's a fascinating thing that I've seen, and this is the work of Dr Bhatman Gulich. Have you ever heard of Dr Bhatman, Gulich Love this guy right.

Speaker 1:

Old school, old school, Old school right.

Speaker 2:

Old school had some amazing lectures, great books, and he found that when the blood volume drops too low, the body turns on histamine, because histamine is what he calls a drought management backup system to say, okay, looks like we're not getting enough water coming in and so let's make sure we partition the water to the vital places in the body. And so we hear I don't know about you, I don't know how much you're working one-on-one with people these days, but histamine is everywhere. Histamine issues and I'm finding a huge amount of them have to do with the inability for the body to just hold onto this water or to have adequate hydration status. So in those cases, absolutely, we need to drink appropriate amounts of water. But unfortunately tap water is basically drinking toxins. We're drinking potentially pharmaceuticals and chlorine and fluoride and things that really I don't think deserve to be in our bodies in a thriving state, to be in a thriving state of health.

Speaker 2:

So the water that we drink, I always say there's a four-step process. Number one filter at the best you can, right, whether it's with reverse osmosis or distillation, or do the best you can to get potentially the toxins out of the water. Then you're gonna want some minerals in there, right, because reverse osmosis takes out all the toxins but it strips all the minerals that we would get from naturally occurring spring water. So the simplest thing I have clients do is just make a basic Soleil and you can Google S-O-L-E Soleil basically just a really concentrated solution of sea salt that's been dissolved in water at a couple of drops, like maybe one drop, two drops per glass, not a lot.

Speaker 2:

But when water has charge it knows how to be. It's better absorbed when water doesn't have charge. These are the people who are like I'm dry all the time. I've got dry hair, dry skin, dry cuticles. I drink, I'm drinking a ton, my nelging bottle. I'm filling it up five times a day and I'm just peeing it out every 20 minutes. It's because your body is not pulling it in right, you're not actually absorbing that water, and so having a little bit of minerals helps it. And then I like to add structure and intention, and this is where we get woo Jay. This is where we get woo let's wait for this.

Speaker 2:

But water molecules actually can bond together in what are called microclusters. You gotta picture them as like almost little tiny geometric figures, and because a geometric figure will actually have a specific resonance in the same way that tuning forks, depending on their shape, can resonate a certain note, the water will do the same thing. So we have to view frequency as like this inner information language of the universe, and the water can hold onto that. And so I have to ask myself what information do I want the water that I'm drinking to contain?

Speaker 2:

You can do things like this is an analemil wand that I've used to structure it so you could vortex it. Those are things that are just very inherently energizing for the water. And then, because the water can hold information, I always like to imprint it with like loving intention or compassion or all that woo is heck stuff, because I know that water is basically this blank canvas just waiting to receive information and hold onto it for us. And so that's the type of water I drink, and I also believe this is why things like positive self-talk matter as well, because the water inside of our bodies, the fluid water in our bodies, like in our cerebrospinal fluid and in our blood, that water can also structure itself, and then that information gets shared throughout the body, and so I want to share information throughout the body that I think is healing and beneficial, as opposed to stuff that may create some stress.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I love this and actually I think it was in Pollock's book. If you guys read the fourth phase of water, he has a really, and I think it's there. Correct me if I'm wrong, kerry, but he has a really interesting description of how water may actually be able to have memory where these hexagonal sheets don't line up the same, so they're kind of like a signature, and we can see this in, maybe like when we look at snowflakes, like not exactly the same and whatever compound it's around that water's in contact with would change the hexagonal layers slightly, which would act almost like a barcode and or a signature for that water. So this may explain some crazy things that we used to think were crazy, like homeopathy, some of the things Kerry's talking about where we can't yet measure thought frequency and feeling frequency. But we can measure other things. Well, actually Heart Math Institute is starting to measure feeling frequency. So we are these electromagnetic fields and these fields are probably it's kind of like this water. From the way I'm seeing it, this water is acting as the tuning fork for some of these electromagnetic frequencies that we put out, thought being one, feeling being another, and so it's actually not as woo-woo as we may think once we start to be like, oh my gosh, look at the mechanism.

Speaker 1:

So science oftentimes is catching up, and so let's cover just the. I wanna be respectful of your time. We're coming up on the hour but one. Since we're on the woo-woo topic, I just wanna cover a couple speculative things with you, because you mentioned Meridians. I certainly have. I actually read a study that I think it was in 2020 that I this particular study I would regard as proof that the chakra system exists. I'll just briefly explain this to people and Kerry may or may not have seen this, but this is basically a study where they took biofield workers, so these would be people who do healing, touch or any kind of energy.

Speaker 1:

Reiki, things like that. And then they took novice people who had no background in this and they basically hooked them up with EMG. So we released EEGs that's the frequency we're picking up from the brain. Ecg that's a frequency we're picking up from the heart. Emg it's from the muscle, but you can pick up energies from these EMGs. So they put them all over up and down the spine and they were looking for to see what they called them biofield bands. They basically wanted to see what areas of the body were releasing higher electromagnetic fields or wider electromagnetic fields or more powerful electromagnetic fields. And what they found was, with these biofield practitioners, that there were certain areas of the body that were really magnified. They found 10 of them actually, so traditionally we talk about seven or eight chakras. They found 10 of these bands. Then they found the exact same 10 bands on the novice individuals, just not magnified as much.

Speaker 1:

And from my perspective I was like, if this is improved, that the chakra system exists, besides the fact that we have these neuroplexuses that correspond with these, and I've always kind of been like chakras, don't talk to me about chakras. And now I'm more like okay, now talk to me about chakras. And so obviously this is sort of theoretical stuff, but if this is the case, right, and we do have these energy systems sort of in the body, do you think that this is related to something underneath even the water layer that we've been talking about, or do you think that the water layer is producing these Cause I'm kind of seeing almost like that, even underneath the water there's this guiding sort of field of energy that the water then sits on top of, that propagates this. That then, of course, the biochemistry sits on top of, and I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts on that woo, woo idea.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, totally yeah. Water is like the perfect what's called a fractal antenna. Fractal antennas are being used in every communication as a way to like really pull in a wide band of frequencies and then transduce it to a signal, right? What does a radio do? Right, it pulls in something that's in my environment and all of a sudden, at channel 103.3, I'm gonna get pop, right, pop station, and it's like so the water inside of us is absolutely, I think, the antenna for what's a very subtle layer of information, or energy and information around us that we call the biofield.

Speaker 2:

And then, just beyond that part of our physical biofield, the biofield really is a part of us. It's an extension of our body into space, invisible around us. And then, outside of that, there's also this field that modern physicists are starting to catch up with, but we've had forgotten for about a hundred years, which they call the zero point field or the quantum field. And you know, but in beautiful civilization, centuries old, right, we, it's been called things like the Akashic record, chi, prana, the ether, like it's been given so many beautiful names that have largely been ignored, like as Wu, and now finally, like you said, modern science is like, oh, we think this is the thing. So I truly believe that we're feeding these chakras with this subtle energy and information. It's being pulled into the water antenna in these, these various, like you said, nerve plexus regions, and then that can get disseminated where it's seated, because water is a beautiful highway.

Speaker 1:

God, carrie, I just love this is such fascinating stuff. I just want to repeat that right. So if we're listening to what Carrie says and of course this is hypothetical stuff, but we do have information to show that this is true so the quantum field sort of distills down into and this may even be one day where we talk about this is where consciousness comes from it kind of distills down into this more subtle energy field, the biofield, and the biofield essentially is sending information through this, you know, transmitter the water which then is influencing all of our biochemistry. And this is a whole different way of organizing and perhaps for the first time, as we begin to fool around with this, understanding how, from a scientific perspective, this energy body is influencing this physical body and we and this water that you know, carrie, so eloquently educated us on, is really the go-between. Perhaps that is translating all this information for us.

Speaker 1:

And then one of the things, the final things I'll say here in regards to chakras and thought, you know, and thinking that you know, one of the things and, by the way, there's research on this, which is why it makes me think of this the Heart Math Institute is doing really interesting research on heart centered, which the heart is one of the you know, the fourth chakra center in traditional, you know systems and they're doing really interesting work where they're actually having people do heart focused meditations and watching this field expand off the body three feet away, six feet away, and also interact and influence the same center in other humans, and we have data to show that this is going on.

Speaker 1:

And so then it makes me think that if we begin to focus on certain areas of the body energetically and certainly we have stories of people saying this chakra focused meditations that these energy centers are influencing perhaps certain parts of the body and they are associated with certain emotional aspects of the body, and so this may even be the go between between our emotions and our thoughts and our physiology as well. So I don't know if you have any final thoughts on something like that, but to me I just find this whole thing incredibly fascinating.

Speaker 2:

It absolutely is, and I think you hit the nail exactly on the head. That's very much how I view all of it. You know, and I do think water is the ultimate receiver of that information and that we are using listen, this is called subtle energy. This subtle energy system goes even below the quantum right. We're not even we're kind of at a layer as we're talking about these layers. We're talking about a layer even deeper than that, and I do feel like a lot of what our body is using for energy and information does come from this field and that we can influence it, and we can influence it with our thoughts, our emotions.

Speaker 2:

There was some great research done early, early on in the Hart Math Institute maybe it was even before it was even called that with Glenn Rine about changes in gene expression, dna folding and unfolding right, all of these things that we can do simply with our thoughts and, like you said, our heartfelt emotions. And so it makes me really, it makes me at least really think about where I dedicate, spend my time, my free time especially. It's like do I wanna read something that just puts me down in the dumps all the time? Do I wanna watch something or be by people who are just really negative. So I've really become choosy in where I focus my attention, because I don't think things were serving me before, now that I know this aspect of human physiology, or what I think is a key aspect of human physiology.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I actually think one of my theories is and what you're doing so beautifully, kari, like one of my theories is that the most important thing that we can do is our authentic purpose, which you are doing, and that that is the ultimate charge and the way that we maintain our mood and our vitality and all of that and the way we share. Just so everyone knows, kari is amazing educator on Instagram. It's at KariBee Wellness on Instagram. She is like constantly teaching us all amazing stuff. I follow her. I'm constantly learning from her. Make sure you follow her there. Where else can they find you, kari?

Speaker 2:

They can go to karibeewelnesscom. I have different tabs, both if you're just an individual who's like, okay, now I wanna support my health with this, so I've got some courses for you, and then also if you're a practitioner, I've got ways for you to learn this and start to feel comfortable teaching it and applying it in clinical practice. It's such a beautiful foundation that makes what you're currently doing it's just going to make what your tools are and your toolbox that much better.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think all of us could benefit from your courses. We need this education. We do not get it. So all you practitioners listening, please go check out her stuff, kari. You're just amazing, you're brilliant. You're just super fun to talk to. I'm just so happy that we finally got to meet face to face. Go ahead and stay on the line, just cause I wanna make sure all this downloads and then, for all of you, we'll see you at the next episode. Thank you so much.

Quantum Biology and Energy Regulation
Water in Energy Cell Reactions
The Role of Exclusion Zone Water
Piezoelectric Effects in the Body
The Power of Structured Water
Water as a Vital Energy Antenna